Guest Post • Jilted Brides

Jilted Brides picking themselves up

and Courting the Stationmaster’s Daughter

by Juli D. Revezzo

Painting of Isabella of Angouleme

Despite the prevalence of happy endings in romance novels, love doesn’t always go to plan. Sometimes, the bride gets cold feet and results in a “runaway bride” scenario; sometimes the happy couple calls it quits before the end of the Engagement breakfast. Heck, even being royalty won’t necessarily save one heartache. Did you know Isabella of Angoulême, in the 13th century stole her daughter’s betrothed?

Now that’s something! If royalty isn’t even immune, it’s inevitable that someday, somewhere, someone’s groom will get cold feet. What’s a jilted bride to do?

Zombie bride photo

Some have gotten famous in recent years for doing good things with their wedding feasts.  Some donate the feast to the homeless (1) and some go on with the parties (2) and honeymoons, some even backpack around the world (3). (and good for them!)  We find, thanks to the 19th century and early 20th, that the jilted bride figures now in all sorts of ghost stories. From the 19th century folktale that inspired Tim Burton’s movie Corpse Bride, to tales of jilted brides dying of heartbreak to later come back as ghosts and haunt…wherever the place seems to be that she died. And some just lose their marbles, like poor demented Miss Havisham. But, in actuality, the jilted bride had recourse to the point where it seemed (according to my research) to not be uncommon for a bride to sue her ex-fiancé for damages! (4) Ha!

One, Harriet Bishop (5), of Minnesota, (post 1849) became a land speculator, teacher, and author.

Cover of Courting the Stationmaster's Daughter by Juli D. Revezzo

In my latest Victorian romance, Courting the Stationmaster’s Daughter, I took a similar tact. When my heroine—Honorine—found herself left at the altar, sure, she wallowed in self-pity for a while (who wouldn’t?) but in the end, like our intrepid brides I mentioned above, she picks herself up, and turns her mind to distractions that may help her townsfolk when their late 19th century subway station is in need. In so doing, she finds the real love of her life: the station’s assistant stationmaster.

Synopsis:

After Honorine Camden is jilted, leaving her stunned and sparking a scandal in her tiny London borough of Wallflower, she’s devastated. But when she overhears her father, the stationmaster, talking about arranging a party for their newly-minted underground railway station, she volunteers to help. Although she’s intrigued with his handsome assistant stationmaster, Shane MacIntyre, she never expects to fall head-over-heels in love with him. Unfortunately, one tragic accident might derail everything.

Available at Amazon HERE

Thanks, Suzanne for having me today! ~ Juli

Bio

Juli D. Revezzo loves fantasy and Celtic mythology and writing stories with all kinds of fantastical elements. She is the author of the historical romances, Courting the Stationmaster’s Daughter, Vesta’s Clockwork Companions, House of Dark Envy, Watchmaker’s Heart, and Lady of the Tarot, the Antique Magic paranormal series and Celtic Stewards Chronicles series and more. She is also a member of the Independent Author Network and the Magic Appreciation Tour.

Follow Author Juli D. Revezzo

To learn more about this and future releases, visit her at: https://www.julidrevezzo.com/

Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.com/Juli-D.-Revezzo/e/B008AHVTLO

Blog at: http://julismapsroom.blogspot.com/

Bookbub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/juli-d-revezzo

Twitter: https://twitter.com/julidrevezzo

FB: https://www.facebook.com/julidrevezzo/

If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter you can do so here: http://eepurl.com/drgFXX

2 thoughts on “Guest Post • Jilted Brides”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.